Beef/ Recipes

Giant T-bone steak with Bacon Alfredo Hasselback Potatoes

July 16, 2020 (Last Updated: August 3, 2020)

This post is sponsored by Omaha Steaks and rest assured all opinions are my own.

When I was just a young girl, my father used to take us out for a dinner and without fail, I would always order a steak.  For some reason, I had the ability to plow through a steak like it was my job. My father would brag to the waitress about how much I would eat.  Look, I don’t know that housing an entire slab of prime rib was something to be proud of at such a young age, but I’ve always had a fascination with large cuts of meat.  I looked at it as a challenge.

Without fail, my side of choice when having steak is always a potato of some sort.  Steak and potatoes, it is classic isn’t it? Sure, I realize it would be more nutritious to have a vegetable of some sort, but hey indulging is fun.

For this cook I wanted to surprise my son with a massive platter of steak and potatoes but I wanted to give it a twist.  This would be a perfect platter to share with any of your loved ones or friends and can easily feed at least 3 people. I decided to cook a 48oz King Cut T-bone steak from Omaha Steakswith a side of bacon alfredo hasselback potatoes.

Look at the size of this beast!  Even though these are sold as T-bone steaks at Omaha Steaks, I lucked out with this one as it would actually classify as a beautiful porterhouse steak because of the size of the tenderloin or filet portion.  No doubt it was one of the most impressive porterhouse steaks I have ever had the pleasure of eating. It had a massive filet and a massive strip on opposite sides of the bone.

To read more about what makes a porterhouse a porterhouse and not a T-bone steak as well as alternate methods to cook one, check out another one of my blog posts here.

Before we get to the recipe, we should probably discuss what hasselback potatoes are.  Hasselback potatoes are potatoes that are sliced along the entire length of the potato approximately half-way through, seasoned then cooked.  Imagine you are slicing potatoes to make potato chips but leaving the potato attached at the bottom of the potato. These potatoes were originally served in a restaurant in Sweden named Hasselbacken, hence the interesting name.  All I know is they are crispy on the outside and soft and delicious on the inside, and that makes me love to eat them.

To cook the steak I am going to use the reverse sear method.  With a steak this large, it is beneficial to bring the internal temperature of the steak up slowly by either cooking it in the oven on a raised rack, or cooking on your grill indirect at 250F until approximately 10-15 degrees short of your ideal finishing temperature.  For this steak I will grill it until it is 120F, then sear it over a direct fire on both sides (approximately 90 seconds per side). If you don’t want to fire up the grill, you can alternatively sear the steak over high heat with a bit of ghee, higher smoke point oil, beef tallow, or bacon fat indoors on the stove.  You might want to crack the windows however as the pan will likely smoke a bit.

The hasselback potatoes can be prepped while the steak is cooking as it will take the steak approximately 90 minutes or so to cook.  To cut the potatoes there are a few options. If you don’t have a gadget like I do (a hasselback potato slicing rack) to cut the slices part way through the potato, you can lay down two chopsticks as a guide to not let your knife cut through the potato all the way.  Laying the potato on a wooden spoon is also an option. Just be extra careful when slicing the potato. It is also a good idea to take a little sliver of potato off of the bottom of the potato to create a flat surface for the potato to sit on as it is more stable. As for the type of potato to use, I like Yukon Gold, Russets, or even red potatoes.

Once all of your potatoes are cut, I coat them with some olive oil and try to get some of the oil in between the slices of potato so they will separate and crisp up while cooking.

All that is left is to crisp up some bacon for bacon bits, chop some fresh flat leaf parsley, and to make the alfredo sauce to top the potatoes with once cooked.  If you don’t want to fry your own bacon or make your own alfredo sauce, you can certainly buy some pre-cooked bacon to finish off and chop up or even some jarred alfredo sauce.  I’m going to be honest with you here though. Half the fun of making a recipe with bacon is that you can treat yourself to a few slices as you are cooking and no one will ever know.  Cooks rules people. I’d be lying if I told you I didn’t also cut off a hunk of parmesan cheese to munch on while making the sauce as well. I highly recommend making your own alfredo sauce as it truly simply to make and is so delicious.

Putting Alfredo sauce on the cooked potatoes

Love beef recipes? Check out my post on how to cook picanha here.

Giant T-bone steak with Bacon Alfredo Hasselback Potatoes

Course Main Course
Cuisine Beef
Keyword Potatoes, Steak, T-Bone
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings 3
Author Melissa Reome

Ingredients

Steak

  • 1 48 oz T-bone steak
  • 2 tbsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp fresh ground pepper
  • 2 tbsp ghee, oil such as extra light olive oil, canola, beef tallow, or bacon fat for searing steak

Bacon Alfredo Hasselback Potatoes

  • 3 lbs medium sized potatoes I used Yukon gold
  • 1/4 cup olive oil or butter
  • 1/2 lb cooked bacon cut into small pieces
  • 1 small bunch flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • 3/4 stick butter 6 tbsp
  • 1 small clove of garlic, minced
  • 3/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1-1 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • Pinch of fresh grated nutmeg optional
  • Freshly ground black pepper and kosher salt or sea salt to taste

Instructions

T-bone Steak

  • Light grill and set up for indirect cooking at 250F.  Alternatively, preheat oven to 250F.
  • Season the steak liberally with kosher salt and pepper.
  • Place the steak on the grill or in the oven on a raised rack and cook until internal temperature is 120F internally when measured on meat thermometer (for medium rare steak).
  • Set up grill direct grilling.  If using a kamado style grill such as a Big Green Egg, I have my vents wide open and let the fire burn over 500F.  On any grill, gas or otherwise turn the heat to high. If using a stovetop skillet, get the pan very hot. I love cast iron for this method.
  • Lightly coat all sides of the meat with oil/fat of choice and place directly over the fire on the grill and sear for approximately 90 seconds on each side.  Pull steak off the grill. Can serve immediately or tent with foil for a few minutes until it is sliced.

Hasselbeck Potatoes

  • Preheat oven or grill to 425F.
  • Wash and dry the potatoes.  
  • Slice the potatoes into ⅛-¼ inch slices being careful not to cut through the bottom of the potato.
  • Place potatoes in grill or oven safe dish and brush the entire outside of the potatoes as well as in between some of the cuts with the oil/fat.
  • Season the potatoes lightly with salt and pepper.
  • Cook the potatoes for approximately 1 hour, brushing with additional oil as the slices fan out more while cooking (approximately half way through).  Final cooking time will vary depending on the size of the potatoes. You are looking for crispy edges and the inside of the potato to be tender when checked.

Alfredo Sauce

  • In a large skillet over medium heat, melt the butter and cook minced garlic for about a minute.  Do not let garlic get too dark as it will turn bitter.
  • Stir in heavy cream, and heat through.  Whisk in Parmesan cheese until the sauce is of desired thickness.   If sauce is too thin, whisk in more cheese. Season to taste with salt and fresh ground pepper.  Add pinch of nutmeg if desired.
  • Top each potato with alfredo sauce, bacon and parsley.
  • Serve immediately.

No Comments

Leave a Reply

Recipe Rating